Dutch alders from Rotterdam for Audley End – part 2

In part 1 of this series I looked at possible ‘continental sources’ John Griffin Griffin may have used to purchase plants in Rotterdam for Audley End in 1775. In this second part I look at the role existing trade routes may have played.

A few days after tragically falling into the hold of his ship in the harbour of Great Yarmouth, captain Walter Phinn died on Tuesday 3 August 1773. An obituary in a newspaper said he had been ‘many years a commander of a vessel in the Rotterdam trade’.1The Ipswich Journal, Saturday 07 August 1773, p2. Via The British Newspaper Archive (£). An announcement in the same newspaper some six years earlier shows how he may have operated.

YARMOUTH, Sept. 12, 1767. THE Ship Friendship, Walter Phinn, Master, will sail for Rotterdam the 13th of September instant : —She will wait there a Fortnight, to take in Goods and Liquors for Norwich, & any other Place in the Counties Norfolk or Suffolk.2The Ipswich Journal, Saturday 12 September 1767, p3. Via The British Newspaper Archive (£).

This advert served as a last call to provide Phinn with goods destined for Rotterdam, or to fill his order book with goods to ship back from there. While London was the main international trading hub in Britain, the trade route between Great Yarmouth and Rotterdam was very busy too.3Rotterdam’s main overseas trading partners were in England, Scotland and Ireland. P.W. Klein, ”Little London’: British merchants in Rotterdam during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries’, in: D.C. Coleman & Peter Mathias [eds], Enterprise and History. Essays in honour of Charles Wilson (Cambridge 1984), p116-134. The relative proximity of both harbours and their accessible hinterland enabled a constant flow of goods from one coast to the other. The preserved part of a doorframe (pictured above) from a house at the Haringvliet in Rotterdam, inscribed ‘Norwich and Iarmouth’, shows the importance of England’s east coast for the city.4From the Museum Rotterdam collection in Rotterdam, dated between 1675 and 1700. Apparently market-boats to Norwich and Great Yarmouth left from the quay before this house. Mutual dependency was so strong that even the ongoing 4th Anglo-Dutch War (1780-1784) didn’t stand in the way of Great Yarmouth hosting a Dutch Fair in September 1783.5The timing of this event is remarkable. Many British shipowners in Rotterdam quickly sold their ships at the start of the war because trade under Dutch or British colours had become too dangerous. P.W. Klein (op.cit. in footnote 3) p131. The Norfolk Chronicle wrote that week: ‘(…) Same day near seventy Dutch fishing scoots arrived at Yarmouth quay. To-morrow begins what is called the Dutch fair‘.6Norfolk Chronicle, Saturday 20 September 1783, page 4. Via The British Newspaper Archive (£). This painting of a Dutch fair on the beach at Yarmouth by George Vincent (1796–1831) is dated 1821 and is currently in the collection of  Elizabethan House Museum in Great Yarmouth.
The number of British merchants in Rotterdam was large enough for Swedish traveller Bengt Ferrner to remark that most inhabitants spoke English in what the British merchants called ‘Little London’.7Bengt Ferrner, Resa i Europa 1758-1762 (Uppsala 1956), p129. He wrote this on 2 July 1759, the first day of his stay at Rotterdam. Resident Lucretia Lombe was born in Norwich and in 1756 as a widow bought a new house at the north side of the Haringvliet from Robert Partridge jr, a Norwich based merchant whose father had settled in Rotterdam decades earlier.8W.J.L. Poelmans, ‘Monté (de)-Lombe’, in: De Nederlandsche Leeuw, jrg. 42 (1924), columns 154-155. See for some info on Robert Partridge sr: P.W. Klein (op.cit. in footnote 3), pp125 and 129. Given the sizable British merchant community there it is no surprise that teenage Humphry Repton ended up in Rotterdam the following decade.

Walter(s) Phinn

Walter Phinn had been sailing to Rotterdam since at least August 1739, when he was one of three British captains seen sailing off to ‘Jarmouth’ in a matter of days.9Leydse courant, Ao 1739, No 102 (26 August 1739), front page, “NEDERLANDEN.“. Scroll down to the text under the header Rotterdam. Port Books of Great Yarmouth in the period reflect the bustling trade between the two cities.10National Archives, E 190Exchequer: King’s Remembrancer: Port Books; E190/580/3, ‘Yarmouth, Controller Overseas, Xmas 1774 – Xmas 1775’. I’d like to take this opportunity to thank the team of Conversation Technicians at the NA, who have been very helpful and forthcoming in preparing items pertaining to ‘Yarmouth’ before my visits. In April 1775, two years after his fatal accident, another Walter Phinn (‘Mar @Rottm‘, and probably a son of the first) and his ship called Friendship brought ‘140 Bunch aldr Plants’ from Rotterdam to Great Yarmouth.11National Archives, E 190/580/3 (op.cit. in footnote 10). Phinn arrived on 10 April 1775, six days after the ‘date stamp’ on the bill. A week later captain Robert Miller arrived from Rotterdam with the Bellona, carrying ‘2000 aldr Plants’.12National Archives, E 190/580/3 (op.cit. in footnote 10). His ship arrived on 17 April 1775. Unfortunately it remains unclear whether Phinn already brought enough plants, but both shipments combined must have sufficed to complete the order of ‘3.000 Alder Trees’ for Audley End.13Unfortunately we don’t know how many plants formed a Bunch. Given the similar ‘Value on Oath’ provided for both (£2-5-0 vs £2-7-6), the number of plants may have been the same. But at this point it’s not possible to make an educated guess.

Alder plants as a commodity?

Research in the Port Books in this decade shows that customs officers in Great Yarmouth saw alders coming in regularly. The number of plants arriving during Lady Day- and Midsummer Day quarters varied: from a total of 10.000 plants in 1770 and 1778, down to 1500 in 1772 (none arrived in 1777 and 1779). Besides the captains and boats already mentioned, they were brought in by Richard Miller, captain of the Polly, and Benjamin Thompson, who operated the Norwich Paquet Boat.14From 1776 onwards the records for this customs office became less detailed and only the total numbers of incoming goods per quarter were registered. Ports of origin were reduced to country of origin and the names of ships and captains were not identified anymore.
Newspaper adverts show that Dublin was another regular destination for Dutch alder plants in this decade. One local newspaper in 1775 had a Dublin seedsman announce:

‘Now landing from on board the Cornelia from Rotterdam, by Edw. Bray, Seedsman, on the Merchant’s-quay, near the Old Bridge, Dublin, some Thousands of handsome Dutch Alder Trees, which he will sell reasonable; (…).'15Saunders’s News-Letter of Friday 10 February 1775, p2. Via The British Newspaper Archive (£). There are more examples of these kind of adverts in Saunders’s Newsletter during the decade.

The perhaps surprising conclusion must be that these common plants were often found on board of ships carrying goods via Rotterdam into Britain and Ireland. But the ‘value on oath’ that accompanied these shipments in port books confirms this was not a staple good for which standard import quota were in place – a declaration or estimate of their value was accepted as a basis for taxation.

Did captains Phinn and Miller load these alders knowing they’d sell easily on the other shore? Or were they specifically sent to collect them? We just don’t know for certain.16The Port Books do not provide enough information to directly connect either transport to the sender or receiver on the bill, Pennystone or De Monté. But how feasible is it that a merchant would send live plants overseas without knowing they’d sell at the other side? The Dublin transports were probably initiated by local seedsmen. And looking at the Audley End bill it is likely that at least one of the Great Yarmouth shipments in 1775 was a commission.17Essex Record Office; D/DBy A33/6, Audley End estate, Household and Estate Papers 1775. The address on the back of the bill is partly missing, but it appears to be addressed to Thomas Pennystone in Saffron Walden, at the time apparently steward of Audley End.18The words ‘Pennystone’, ‘/allden’ and ‘Essex’ can still be read. The ships arrived at Great Yarmouth six and thirteen days after the date on the bill. If it was standard practice for Phinn and Miller to wait at Rotterdam for 14 days before sailing back, they could have both brought along a written order from Pennystone on their way to Rotterdam.

Although falling into a larger pattern of trade and shipping routes, this foreign purchase was a deliberate one. Since alders are hardly exotics, the question is: why would Audley End and Dublin seedsmen buy these plants overseas? It may have depended on what exactly they bought.
In 1966, J.D. Williams seemed doubtful whether this had been a good deal for John Griffin Griffin, given the extra costs he incurred for transport, packaging and ‘Custom House charges’.19J.D. Williams, Audley End. The Restoration of 1762 – 1797, Essex Record Office publications, No. 45 (Chelmsford 1966), p46. There is a little bit of information available about Dutch alder prices and sizes. In a third and final part of this series I’ll go into that in more detail.

Footnotes

1 The Ipswich Journal, Saturday 07 August 1773, p2. Via The British Newspaper Archive (£).
2 The Ipswich Journal, Saturday 12 September 1767, p3. Via The British Newspaper Archive (£).
3 Rotterdam’s main overseas trading partners were in England, Scotland and Ireland. P.W. Klein, ”Little London’: British merchants in Rotterdam during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries’, in: D.C. Coleman & Peter Mathias [eds], Enterprise and History. Essays in honour of Charles Wilson (Cambridge 1984), p116-134.
4 From the Museum Rotterdam collection in Rotterdam, dated between 1675 and 1700. Apparently market-boats to Norwich and Great Yarmouth left from the quay before this house.
5 The timing of this event is remarkable. Many British shipowners in Rotterdam quickly sold their ships at the start of the war because trade under Dutch or British colours had become too dangerous. P.W. Klein (op.cit. in footnote 3) p131.
6 Norfolk Chronicle, Saturday 20 September 1783, page 4. Via The British Newspaper Archive (£). This painting of a Dutch fair on the beach at Yarmouth by George Vincent (1796–1831) is dated 1821 and is currently in the collection of  Elizabethan House Museum in Great Yarmouth.
7 Bengt Ferrner, Resa i Europa 1758-1762 (Uppsala 1956), p129. He wrote this on 2 July 1759, the first day of his stay at Rotterdam.
8 W.J.L. Poelmans, ‘Monté (de)-Lombe’, in: De Nederlandsche Leeuw, jrg. 42 (1924), columns 154-155. See for some info on Robert Partridge sr: P.W. Klein (op.cit. in footnote 3), pp125 and 129.
9 Leydse courant, Ao 1739, No 102 (26 August 1739), front page, “NEDERLANDEN.“. Scroll down to the text under the header Rotterdam.
10 National Archives, E 190Exchequer: King’s Remembrancer: Port Books; E190/580/3, ‘Yarmouth, Controller Overseas, Xmas 1774 – Xmas 1775’. I’d like to take this opportunity to thank the team of Conversation Technicians at the NA, who have been very helpful and forthcoming in preparing items pertaining to ‘Yarmouth’ before my visits.
11 National Archives, E 190/580/3 (op.cit. in footnote 10). Phinn arrived on 10 April 1775, six days after the ‘date stamp’ on the bill.
12 National Archives, E 190/580/3 (op.cit. in footnote 10). His ship arrived on 17 April 1775.
13 Unfortunately we don’t know how many plants formed a Bunch. Given the similar ‘Value on Oath’ provided for both (£2-5-0 vs £2-7-6), the number of plants may have been the same. But at this point it’s not possible to make an educated guess.
14 From 1776 onwards the records for this customs office became less detailed and only the total numbers of incoming goods per quarter were registered. Ports of origin were reduced to country of origin and the names of ships and captains were not identified anymore.
15 Saunders’s News-Letter of Friday 10 February 1775, p2. Via The British Newspaper Archive (£). There are more examples of these kind of adverts in Saunders’s Newsletter during the decade.
16 The Port Books do not provide enough information to directly connect either transport to the sender or receiver on the bill, Pennystone or De Monté.
17 Essex Record Office; D/DBy A33/6, Audley End estate, Household and Estate Papers 1775.
18 The words ‘Pennystone’, ‘/allden’ and ‘Essex’ can still be read.
19 J.D. Williams, Audley End. The Restoration of 1762 – 1797, Essex Record Office publications, No. 45 (Chelmsford 1966), p46.
Summary

In 1775 kocht men ten behoeve van Audley End in Essex, 3000 elzen in Rotterdam. In deel twee van deze serie kijken we naar Britse douaneregisters, en naar het belang van ‘Britse’ handel voor Rotterdam.

Continue reading

Dutch alders from Rotterdam for Audley End – part 1

‘Sir John clearly had his continental sources’, Jane Brown wrote in 2011, specifically referring to a purchase of ‘3,000 Dutch alders from Rotterdam’.1Jane Brown, Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown. The Omnipotent Magician 1716-1783 (London 2011), p170. Brown implied that Audley End owner Sir John Griffin Griffin may have deviated from designer Lancelot Brown’s planting intentions. But these plants were bought in 1775, long after Lancelot Brown had left Audley End in 1768 after a quarrel about operations and progress.2J.D. Williams, Audley End. The Restoration of 1762 – 1797, Essex Record Office publications, No. 45 (Chelmsford 1966), p46, footnote 27. At the time Joseph Hicks oversaw work on the new layout, probably adhering to the original Brown plan. In 1966, J.D. Williams added the word ‘Dutch’ to the transaction (the bill just says ‘3.000 Alder Trees’), but he also provided the name of their supplier: ‘a certain Catherine de Monte of Rotterdam.'3Scan of the bill courtesy of Essex Record Office; D/DBy A33/6, Audley End estate, Household and Estate Papers 1775.

Her Rotterdam roots sparked my interest. Who was she? What was her role in this transaction? Were these plants purchased from her for a specific reason? Could she have been the continental source of plants for John Griffin Griffin? That may have been the case, but since his brother-in-law was Dutch, ‘Sir John’ was possibly spoilt for choice. Here’s a look at these most likely ‘continental sources’.

Jan Walraad van Welderen

In May 1759, Jan Walraad van Welderen married Ann Whitwell in The Hague.4Essex Record Office holds a 1770 copy of their marriage settlement: D/Dby F34A. She had been a courtier of Anne of Hannover (widow of stadtholder Willem IV and George II’s eldest daughter), who had recently passed away. Ann Whitwell was also Sir John’s younger sister: he went by the surname Whitwell till 1748, when a petition to change his name from John (Griffin) Whitwell to John Griffin Griffin was passed by the House of Lords.5Journal of the House of Lords Volume 27, 1746-1752 (London, 1767-1830), pp. 251-257 (source: British History Online). Van Welderen and his family travelled to London in the Autumn of 1762, where he was appointed ambassador for the States General of the United Provinces of the Netherlands. He remained in that position till 1780, when he was called back because of the 4th Anglo-Dutch war (1780-1784). Van Welderen stayed in the Dutch Republic for the next one and a half decade, till a combination of his wife’s death and the pro-French, anti-Orangist Batavian Revolution drove him back to England in 1796. He lived at 16 Saville Row in London when he died in 1807.6See ‘Cork Street and Savile Row Area: Table of notable inhabitants on the Burlington Estate.’ Survey of London: Volumes 31 and 32, St James Westminster, Part 2. Ed. F H W Sheppard. London: London County Council, 1963. 566-572. British History Online. Web. 11 October 2020. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-london/vols31-2/pt2/pp566-572.

At the very end of his life (1806) Van Welderen was elevated to the position of Land Commander of the Bailiwick of Utrecht of the Teutonic Order, a Protestant branch of the Roman Catholic Deutscher Orden.7He’d been a member of the order since at least 1766. In July 2017 Audley End had two portraits of Van Welderen on display, where he is wearing a so-called ‘Malteze cross’. Though there is more than one similarity, Van Welderen’s cross pattéé probably should be identified as the cross of this Teutonic order.8He was portrayed in 1808, after his death, as Land Commander in a range with his peers in the collections of the Duitse Orde. It was painted by Pieter Christoffel Wonder (1777-1852).
Referred to as Count Welderen or Comte de Welderen during his professional life, he is identified at Audley End as ‘John Walrond, Comte de Welderen‘, an anglicised version of his name that goes back to a history of Audley End, published in 1836.9Richard Lord Braybrooke, The history of Audley End. To which are appended notices of the town and parish  in the county of Essex (London 1836), p129. An epitaph or plaque with memorial inscriptions devoted to the Griffin-Whitwell family, once located in the now demolished St. James’s Church on Hampstead Road (London) referred to him as ‘(…) another brother-in-law of Lord Howard de Walden, the Count of Walderen, Ambassador from the States General to Great Britain (1762–1780) who married Anne Whitwell, (d. 1807)‘.10‘St. James Church, Hampstead Road’, in Survey of London: Volume 21, the Parish of St Pancras Part 3: Tottenham Court Road and Neighbourhood, ed. J R Howard Roberts and Walter H Godfrey (London, 1949), pp. 123-136. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-london/vol21/pt3/p123-136.
Jan Walraad van Welderen is hardly known at home. He is credited for persuading the Mozart family, who were on their way back home from London in 1765, to make a detour via the court in The Hague.11Piet Verwijmeren, Mozart op reis. De tournee van een wonderkind, 1763-1766 (Zutphen 2005), p136-137. Alternatively see W. Lievense, De familie Mozart op bezoek in Nederland (Hilversum 1965), p12. He was a close continental source for Sir John but is not known for his personal interest in trade, gardens or plants, and therefore not a likely mediator for this transaction.

Catharin Mary de Monté

Catharin Mary de Monté was directly involved with the transport of alders from Rotterdam, so much is certain.12The spelling of her first name here is based on how she was baptized, but seems neither Dutch or English. Since her name on the bill was shortened as Cathn de Monte, it appears she didn’t use the letter ‘e’ at the end of her name herself. Use of the accent on the letter ‘e’ in their last name was inconsistent but would increase towards the end of the eighteenth century. Catharin was born in Rotterdam as the daughter of Johannes de Monté and Lucretia (Lucy) Lombe. He was born in Batavia (now Jakarta) in the Dutch East Indies, she was born into a family of silk merchants in Norwich, where the couple got married in 1743. Following Johannes and Lucy to Rotterdam was her brother Thomas, who from 1746 onwards would be clerk in their companies.13The firm operated under the names Fa. John de Monté; Fa. John de Monte & Comp; and later Firma Demonte & Van Bazel. In 1752 Thomas Lombe was granted permission by Johannes de Monté to venture out into the world. In Dutch: ‘betuigt, dat de sterke genegentheit van den voorn~ Thomas Lombe om vreemde landen te bezigtigen hem Compt [JdM] alleen heeft doen resolveren aan denselven zijne dismissie te verlenen.’ (Stadsarchief Rotterdam, Oud Notarieel Archief, inv.nr. 2817, p386, deed dated 13 april 1752). After her husband’s death in 1755, Lucy Lombe continued the business under the name Wede Monté & Van Bazel, arranging transports to and from British ports.14The Teesside area often occurs in their shipping contracts. A merchant called Dowson or Dawson, from Yarm near Stockton-on-Tees, is mentioned. Living in Rotterdam, Lucy Lombe remained attached to her native land. The Lombe family owned several properties in Norfolk and some of these passed into her hands, for example near Swanton Morley and in (Great) Yarmouth. In Rotterdam she could attend two churches that served the English community and at some stage Lucy bought herself a Holy Bible, printed in 1755.15Now kept in the Verloren family archive in Alkmaar, Westfries Archief, toegang 1535, inv.nr. 657. The same archive holds a Holy Bible dated 1772, which probably belonged to her son Johan Philip de Monté (1754-1814), inv.nr. 665.

Catharin’s contribution to the business remains unclear, but this bill indicates she played an active role. Catharin never had children, and she waited till a year after her mother’s death to marry widower Adrianus Cornelis Oudorp, at the age of 49.16On the 30th of March 1795. She died six years later, a year after this charming family portrait was made.17Painting dated in 1800 by Nicolaes Muys (1740-1808), currently in the collection of Museum Rotterdam, on loan from the Westfries Museum in Hoorn.
The family business seems to have shipped anything between ports in the wider North Sea region. From what can be gleaned from the little evidence that remains, they didn’t specialise in plants or other ‘fresh’ goods. Their papers also don’t show they owned any nurseries, or fields where alders could be grown. The De Montés probably considered these plants as just another tradable commodity, an easy sale that brought cash in their pockets.

Having identified and dismissed these two ‘continental sources’ a question comes to mind: did Sir John Griffin Griffin really need such sources for a purchase like this, or could he rely on a well established trade connection between Rotterdam and Great Yarmouth? Read more about that in part 2.

Footnotes

1 Jane Brown, Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown. The Omnipotent Magician 1716-1783 (London 2011), p170.
2 J.D. Williams, Audley End. The Restoration of 1762 – 1797, Essex Record Office publications, No. 45 (Chelmsford 1966), p46, footnote 27.
3 Scan of the bill courtesy of Essex Record Office; D/DBy A33/6, Audley End estate, Household and Estate Papers 1775.
4 Essex Record Office holds a 1770 copy of their marriage settlement: D/Dby F34A.
5 Journal of the House of Lords Volume 27, 1746-1752 (London, 1767-1830), pp. 251-257 (source: British History Online).
6 See ‘Cork Street and Savile Row Area: Table of notable inhabitants on the Burlington Estate.’ Survey of London: Volumes 31 and 32, St James Westminster, Part 2. Ed. F H W Sheppard. London: London County Council, 1963. 566-572. British History Online. Web. 11 October 2020. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-london/vols31-2/pt2/pp566-572.
7 He’d been a member of the order since at least 1766.
8 He was portrayed in 1808, after his death, as Land Commander in a range with his peers in the collections of the Duitse Orde. It was painted by Pieter Christoffel Wonder (1777-1852).
9 Richard Lord Braybrooke, The history of Audley End. To which are appended notices of the town and parish  in the county of Essex (London 1836), p129.
10 ‘St. James Church, Hampstead Road’, in Survey of London: Volume 21, the Parish of St Pancras Part 3: Tottenham Court Road and Neighbourhood, ed. J R Howard Roberts and Walter H Godfrey (London, 1949), pp. 123-136. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-london/vol21/pt3/p123-136.
11 Piet Verwijmeren, Mozart op reis. De tournee van een wonderkind, 1763-1766 (Zutphen 2005), p136-137. Alternatively see W. Lievense, De familie Mozart op bezoek in Nederland (Hilversum 1965), p12.
12 The spelling of her first name here is based on how she was baptized, but seems neither Dutch or English. Since her name on the bill was shortened as Cathn de Monte, it appears she didn’t use the letter ‘e’ at the end of her name herself. Use of the accent on the letter ‘e’ in their last name was inconsistent but would increase towards the end of the eighteenth century.
13 The firm operated under the names Fa. John de Monté; Fa. John de Monte & Comp; and later Firma Demonte & Van Bazel. In 1752 Thomas Lombe was granted permission by Johannes de Monté to venture out into the world. In Dutch: ‘betuigt, dat de sterke genegentheit van den voorn~ Thomas Lombe om vreemde landen te bezigtigen hem Compt [JdM] alleen heeft doen resolveren aan denselven zijne dismissie te verlenen.’ (Stadsarchief Rotterdam, Oud Notarieel Archief, inv.nr. 2817, p386, deed dated 13 april 1752).
14 The Teesside area often occurs in their shipping contracts. A merchant called Dowson or Dawson, from Yarm near Stockton-on-Tees, is mentioned.
15 Now kept in the Verloren family archive in Alkmaar, Westfries Archief, toegang 1535, inv.nr. 657. The same archive holds a Holy Bible dated 1772, which probably belonged to her son Johan Philip de Monté (1754-1814), inv.nr. 665.
16 On the 30th of March 1795.
17 Painting dated in 1800 by Nicolaes Muys (1740-1808), currently in the collection of Museum Rotterdam, on loan from the Westfries Museum in Hoorn.
Summary

Een bijzin in een publicatie over Lancelot Brown, met betrekking tot zijn werk op Audley End, leidde tot een speurtocht in Rotterdamse en Britse archieven. Dit is deel één van het resultaat.

Continue reading

De tuinen van Bierens aan de Amstel

Mijn artikel uit 2019 over de aanleg van Voorland eindigt met een vermelding van de zoektocht van de eigenaren naar een nieuwe tuinman.1H. van der Eijk, ‘Geschetst en getekend; geëtst maar verdwenen. Voorland in de Watergraafsmeer’, in: Cascade bulletin voor tuinhistorie, Jaargang 2018 (27), nummer 2 | Jaargang 2019 (28), nummer 1, p.168-186. De bundel is in de handel : Arinda van der Does, Jan Holwerda, Korneel Ashman (red.), Tuingeschiedenis in Nederland III – Verdwenen tuinen, Stichting Tuinhistorisch Genootschap Cascade, 2019. Gezien het feit dat het park zojuist door Michael en zijn knecht Zocher was aangelegd, moest dat bijna wel iemand zijn geweest met ervaring in landschapstuinen. Correspondentie uit november 1788 tussen het echtpaar Van Winter-Van der Poorten vertelt ons dat een van de potentiële tuinmannen Willem Routers (of Roeters) heette.2Collectie Six, Archief, CS73668; Gallery 136-150; images CS_73668_0146 en CS_73668_0147; Anna Louisa van der Poorten aan Pieter van Winter Nsz., 3 november 1788. Deze tuinman had zeven jaar in Oostzaan gewerkt, en daarvoor vier jaar als ‘ondertuinman’ aan de Amstel, bij Bierens. Het lukt voorlopig nog niet om die tuin in Oostzaan te vinden, maar de tuin van Bierens lijkt te zijn geïdentificeerd.

Oostrust en De Morgenstond

Op het moment van schrijven gaf de bestaande literatuur geen aanwijzingen over welke tuin of park het dan kon gaan. De steeds beter toegankelijke Notariële Archieven van het Stadsarchief Amsterdam leiden nu tot de vrijwel zekere identificatie van het buiten van Bierens (waar onze tuinman dan tussen circa 1777 en 1781 moet hebben gewerkt).
Anthony Jacob Bierens was eigenaar van de naast elkaar aan de Amstel gelegen hofsteden Oostrust en De Morgenstond, een aardig eind buiten de stad ten oosten van Amstelveen en ten noorden van Ouderkerk aan de Amstel.3Zie beide buitens uitgelicht in rood op het detail uit Pieter Meyer’s Nieuwe Kaart van den Amstel Stroom uit 1755. De Diemer- of Watergraafsmeer, waar Voorland lag, was hemelsbreed niet eens zo ver weg. Over beide buitens is in deze periode weinig bekend, maar Bierens kocht De Morgenstond in 1765 van Hendrik Rietveld en zou het in 1789 hebben verkocht.4Zie voor de aankoop: SAA, Notariële Archieven, archiefnummer 5075, aktenummer 324995. De verkoop wordt vermeld in Christian Bertram, Noord-Hollands Arcadia. Ruim 400 Noord-Hollandse buitenplaatsen in tekeningen, prenten en kaarten uit de Provinciale Atlas Noord-Holland, Alphen aan den Rijn 2005, p203-205. Wanneer Anthony Jacob Bierens de hofstede Oostrust kocht is nog onbekend, maar hij was in 1771 in ieder geval eigenaar: Dirk Willink, ongetwijfeld familie van Bierens’ echtgenote Susanna Hasina Willink, schreef in dat jaar een lovend hofdicht op Oostrust ter gelegenheid van hun 25-jarig huwelijk.5Het hofdicht wordt bewaard in de collectie ‘gelegenheidsuitgaven’ van de bibliotheek van het Stadsarchief Amsterdam.

Willem Roeters en Nicolaas Sierach

Anna Louisa van der Poorten schreef aan haar man dat de tuinman die zij gesproken had was getrouwd met een voormalige keukenmeid van Bierens. Daarnaast had hij twee kinderen, een van zes en een van vier jaar oud. Die keukenmeid moet dan Johanna de Wit zijn geweest, die in 1782 in Amsterdam trouwde met Willem Roeters.6SAA, Ondertrouwregister, archiefnummer 5001, inventarisnummer 626, blad p.574. Roeters was afkomstig uit Osnabrück, en woonde op dat moment (zoals te verwachten) in Oostzaan. De Wit kwam oorspronkelijk uit Groningen. Zij lieten in 1783 en 1784 achtereenvolgens een dochter en zoon dopen in Amsterdam.
We weten ook wie zijn baas was op Oostrust. Het toeval wil dat de tuinman van Oostrust in 1772 met zijn vrouw naar de notaris stapte om hun testament te laten opmaken: Nicolaas Sierach en Clara Maria Berum.7SAA, Notariële Archieven, archiefnummer 5075, aktenummer 67665. Hij is ‘Thuinman’, beiden ‘wonende op de Hofstede Oostrust, aan de Rivier de Amstel’. Zij tekende met een kruis en haar naam wordt in andere akten op de meest uiteenlopende manieren geschreven. Helemaal zeker is het niet, maar het lijkt erop dat de tuinman, die dit testament ondertekende als Claas Sierach, op Oostrust bleef werken. In 1789, zijn vrouw was inmiddels blijkbaar overleden, maakte ‘Klaas Sijrach’ een nieuw testament op, waarin hij zijn identiteit liet bevestigen door twee personen die bij Anthony Jacob Bierens in dienst waren.8Dit waren Fredrik (‘Freedrik’) Heuslij en Willem Sprenger, ‘beiden wonende binnen deze stad [Amsterdam] in dienst van den Weledelen Heer Anthony Jacob Bierens’. Sierachs enige erfgenamen waren een nicht (oorspronkelijk uit Osnabrück) en twee neven (SAA, Notariële Archieven, archiefnummer 5075, aktenummer 12495). Een van hen, Casper Font, zou in 1790 zijn zoon de doopnamen Nicolaas Sierach geven. Sierach, zelf waarschijnlijk ook een Duitser, was in 1783 aanwezig (als ‘Claas Sirach’) bij de doop van het eerste kind van zijn voormalige ondertuinman en de voormalige keukenmeid van zijn baas.9SAA, DTB Dopen, archiefnummer 5001, inventarisnummer 266, blad p.75(folio 51), nr.7, aktenummer DTB 266.

Oranjehuis ‘als een halvemaan’

Over de ontwikkelingen op Oostrust na 1771 is veel te weinig bekend, maar grootschalige veranderingen lijken er niet te hebben plaatsgevonden. De kadastrale minuutplan uit 1818 geeft een tuinaanleg weer die waarschijnlijk, afgezien van de iets minder rechtlijnige oevers van de waterpartijen, nog steeds met het hofdicht in de hand te verkennen was.10Kadastrale Minuutplan gemeente Nieuwer-Amstel, Sectie I, Middelpolder Oostzijde, Blad 1. De zinsnede ‘daar zich ‘t Oranjehuis toont als een halvemaan’ was bijna een halve eeuw later nog steeds van toepassing, terwijl men zich ook nog steeds kon voorstellen dat in de nabijgelegen kom ‘het waterpluimgediert de vedren pluist en net en vrolyk duikt en tiert’.11De enorme koepel die ooit het noordelijker gelegen De Morgenstond sierde, is verdwenen, van de aanleg lijkt nog wel een ‘grand canal’-achtige vijver te resteren.

Oostrust had ongetwijfeld een fraaie aanleg, met zijn schaduwrijk slingerbos en heesters, maar of deze de aanwezige tuinlieden voldoende ervaring kon bieden om vervolgens in een gloednieuw landschappelijk park aan de slag te gaan, is de vraag. Twee tuinen, twee tuinlieden en een hofdicht zijn gevonden; maar de speurtocht gaat verder.

Footnotes

1 H. van der Eijk, ‘Geschetst en getekend; geëtst maar verdwenen. Voorland in de Watergraafsmeer’, in: Cascade bulletin voor tuinhistorie, Jaargang 2018 (27), nummer 2 | Jaargang 2019 (28), nummer 1, p.168-186. De bundel is in de handel : Arinda van der Does, Jan Holwerda, Korneel Ashman (red.), Tuingeschiedenis in Nederland III – Verdwenen tuinen, Stichting Tuinhistorisch Genootschap Cascade, 2019.
2 Collectie Six, Archief, CS73668; Gallery 136-150; images CS_73668_0146 en CS_73668_0147; Anna Louisa van der Poorten aan Pieter van Winter Nsz., 3 november 1788.
3 Zie beide buitens uitgelicht in rood op het detail uit Pieter Meyer’s Nieuwe Kaart van den Amstel Stroom uit 1755. De Diemer- of Watergraafsmeer, waar Voorland lag, was hemelsbreed niet eens zo ver weg.
4 Zie voor de aankoop: SAA, Notariële Archieven, archiefnummer 5075, aktenummer 324995. De verkoop wordt vermeld in Christian Bertram, Noord-Hollands Arcadia. Ruim 400 Noord-Hollandse buitenplaatsen in tekeningen, prenten en kaarten uit de Provinciale Atlas Noord-Holland, Alphen aan den Rijn 2005, p203-205.
5 Het hofdicht wordt bewaard in de collectie ‘gelegenheidsuitgaven’ van de bibliotheek van het Stadsarchief Amsterdam.
6 SAA, Ondertrouwregister, archiefnummer 5001, inventarisnummer 626, blad p.574.
7 SAA, Notariële Archieven, archiefnummer 5075, aktenummer 67665. Hij is ‘Thuinman’, beiden ‘wonende op de Hofstede Oostrust, aan de Rivier de Amstel’. Zij tekende met een kruis en haar naam wordt in andere akten op de meest uiteenlopende manieren geschreven.
8 Dit waren Fredrik (‘Freedrik’) Heuslij en Willem Sprenger, ‘beiden wonende binnen deze stad [Amsterdam] in dienst van den Weledelen Heer Anthony Jacob Bierens’. Sierachs enige erfgenamen waren een nicht (oorspronkelijk uit Osnabrück) en twee neven (SAA, Notariële Archieven, archiefnummer 5075, aktenummer 12495). Een van hen, Casper Font, zou in 1790 zijn zoon de doopnamen Nicolaas Sierach geven.
9 SAA, DTB Dopen, archiefnummer 5001, inventarisnummer 266, blad p.75(folio 51), nr.7, aktenummer DTB 266.
10 Kadastrale Minuutplan gemeente Nieuwer-Amstel, Sectie I, Middelpolder Oostzijde, Blad 1.
11 De enorme koepel die ooit het noordelijker gelegen De Morgenstond sierde, is verdwenen, van de aanleg lijkt nog wel een ‘grand canal’-achtige vijver te resteren.
Summary

Filling in some blanks: the couple owning a garden I wrote about, was looking for a new gardener in 1788. For Willem Roeters, one of the candidates, information about his previous experience pointed towards two now virtually unknown gardens. The ever increasing indexes of the Amsterdam Municipal Archives helped identify one of these gardens (or rather: two adjacent ones from one owner), a garden poem and even its head gardener. But it doesn’t seem to have been a garden where Roeters could have learned the craft of modern gardening. There still is one garden left to identify, though.

Continue reading

Het temmen van Woestduin

‘Wat was het mooi geweest als die Wageningers in de jaren tachtig het archief van de familie Ten Hove hadden bezocht.’ Deze gedachte bekroop me terwijl ik verleden jaar de kasboeken van David ten Hove doornam. Hij was onder meer eigenaar van de hofstede Woestduin bij Vogelenzang.1Hij erfde in 1756 de buitenplaats Rhijnauwen bij Utrecht van zijn vader, Woestduin in 1763/4 via zijn moeder en hij erfde De Nes, of Nesserak (destijds een buitenplaats op een eiland in de rivier de Vecht, ook wel Realeneiland genoemd) in 1768 uit de nalatenschap van de moeder van zijn eerste vrouw. Er zijn geen aanwijzingen dat Snoek voor Ten Hove werk op Rhijnauwen heeft verricht. Snoek werkte wel op De Nes, dat door Ten Hove werd opgeknapt ten behoeve van zijn dochter. Woestduin is een nog steeds bestaande buitenplaats waarvan het grondgebied nu in eigendom is van enkele particulieren en Landschap Noord-Holland.3Landschap Noord-Holland lijkt hun deel van Woestduin nu samengetrokken te hebben met de buurman, buitenplaats Leyduin, en het gebied als een geheel te beschouwen. Vinkenduin completeert het drietal buitenplaatsen dat nu onder de noemer Leyduin wordt gerangschikt. Tot mijn verbazing was blijkbaar nog niemand op het idee gekomen om Ten Hove’s kasboeken te gebruiken om meer te weten te komen over de aanleg van Woestduin. De toekomstvisie van betreffende Wageningers haalt verder echter een behoorlijk compleet bronnenoverzicht aan en ook inhoudelijk bevat het weinig missers.2Anneke Coops, Monique Hootsmans en Jeroen Vandeursen, Leyduin, Vinkenduin, Woestduin: een visie op de toekomstige ontwikkeling van drie buitenplaatsen in Zuid-Kennemerland, Wageningen 1985. Uit de inventaris van het archief van de familie Ten Hove wordt bovendien niet duidelijk of men destijds van het bestaan ervan op de hoogte kon zijn geweest.4Nationaal Archief, Inventaris van het archief van de familie Ten Hove (1589-1791), Den Haag (z.j.), p10. Dus schreef ik nu maar een artikel over dit grote park in de Kennemerduinen.5Henk van der Eijk, ‘Het park van Woestduin, een achttiende-eeuwse creatie van Adriaan Snoek en Hendrik Horsman’, in: Cascade bulletin voor tuinhistorie 28 (2019), nummer 2, p37-55. In mijn artikel noem ik Monique Hootsmans overigens foutief Houtmans, excuses daarvoor. Ik zou graag autocorrect de schuld willen geven (en dat doe ik dan ook).

Adriaan Snoek en Woestduin

Landmeter en tuinontwerper Adriaan Snoek en het park van Woestduin zijn in de tuinhistorische literatuur al bijna een halve eeuw met elkaar verbonden middels een bewaard gebleven ontwerp van Snoek uit 1766. Dat ontwerp is nooit uitgevoerd. Om die reden was het lang de vraag of Snoek wel op goede gronden met de aanleg van het park in verband kon worden gebracht. Had men het archief van David ten Hove eerder doorgenomen, was dat niet zo lang een vraag gebleven.

We denken dat bovenstaand ontwerp uit 1766 niet is uitgevoerd omdat het vrijwel geen overeenkomsten vertoont met een circa 25 jaar later gemaakte plattegrond van Woestduin. Waarschijnlijk klopt dat ook. Maar uit mijn onderzoek blijkt dat Snoek al sinds 1754 betrokken was bij diverse uitbreidingen van het terrein naast de oorspronkelijke buitenplaats, die zouden leiden tot het grondgebied dat op het ontwerp zichtbaar is. Snoek was hier tot 1765 werkzaam in zijn hoedanigheid als landmeter: het uitzetten van de nieuwe grenzen en het bepalen van de oppervlakte.

Na het terzijde geschoven ontwerp werd Snoek in 1768 betaald voor heel concreet werk: ‘het maken van een kom in het duin’. Nevenstaande ontwerptekening kan aan Snoek worden toegeschreven. Het ten zuiden van de kom gelegen uitzichtpunt, met de twee lange opgangen, hoorde waarschijnlijk bij deze zelfde opdracht. Ook het verder vlakke terrein in de omgeving van dit uitzichtpunt kan aan Snoek worden toegeschreven: hij werd immers betaald om het zuidelijke deel van het terrein te ‘planeeren’. Snoek kreeg in vier termijnen 3050 gulden voor zijn rol in de aanleg.6Volgens de conversietool van het Internationaal Instituut voor Sociale Geschiedenis (IISG) zou dat omgerekend naar 2016 ruim ƒ68,000,- zijn geweest, of € 30.980,74.

De kom van Snoek is wel terug te vinden op de circa 1790 gemaakte plattegrond van Woestduin. Ondanks de aanleg in 1901 van een paardenrenbaan, is een groot deel van de kom nog steeds zichtbaar in het terrein. De afbeelding links is een weergave van een detail van de kaart van Woestduin uit circa 1790, waar een laag van de huidige situatie op basis van LIDAR-gegevens van de AHN3 (Actueel Hoogtebestand Nederland) overheen is geprojecteerd. De kom van Adriaan Snoek is zichtbaar in blauw, de verhoogd aangelegde renbaan is de lichtgroene band die van linksboven naar rechtsonder door de kom snijdt. De in rood weergegeven heuvel met drie opgangen staat op geen enkel bekend ontwerp van Snoek weergegeven. Hij werd op een gegeven moment wel betaald voor de aanleg van een ‘terras’, maar of dit heuveltje daarmee bedoeld kan zijn, is de vraag.

Hendrik Horsman, de grote onbekende

Naast Snoek verdiende ene Hendrik Horsman flink aan Woestduin, hij kreeg zelfs 3500 gulden in deze periode.7In 2016 zou dat omgerekend ruim ƒ78.500,- zijn geweest, of € 35.621,79. Dit gebeurde in 1766, nadat Snoek in 1765 voor de noordwestelijke uitbreiding van het terrein had getekend, maar vóór zijn ontwerp van de kom. Horsman werd betaald voor het leveren van plantmateriaal, maar vooral voor het aanleggen van de noordelijke laan. Deze verving de oude, bestaande routes door de duinen, reden waarom Ten Hove bedragen schonk aan de armen van zowel Vogelenzang als van Overveen, gemeenschappen die door de omlegging werden geraakt. De thans zeer onregelmatige laan is een vrijwel ongebruikte route in het landschap van drie aaneengesloten landgoederen. In hun toekomstvisie uit 1985 kenden Coops en Hootsmans juist een belangrijke rol toe aan deze laan, door hen als een van de verbindende routes door het gebied aangemerkt.8Zie Coops (op.cit.), resp. een losse kaart in Deel III, Bijlage 8, Kaartbijlagen en in Deel I de Plantoelichting, waarin deze laan ‘een belangrijk onderdeel van de hoofdstruktuur’ wordt genoemd (p110). Ik vind dat nog steeds een goed idee, hoewel de verlegging van de looproute naar deze laan wel voor iets meer verstoring in het naastgelegen gebied zou zorgen. Dat zijn afwegingen die Landschap Noord-Holland moet meenemen in hun beleid en inrichting van het gebied. In ieder geval verdient de laan als historisch element en restant van de oorspronkelijke aanleg van het park duidelijk meer aandacht.

Over Hendrik Horsman zelf bestaan nog veel onduidelijkheden. Naast plantenleverancier en laanmaker lijkt hij Ten Hove ook regelmatig diens ‘Actens der Jagt’ te hebben bezorgd. Na 1778 kwam hij in de kasboeken niet meer voor, wat een direct gevolg lijkt te zijn geweest van zijn overlijden. In december 1778 was de Ridderschap van Holland op zoek naar een opvolger voor Hendrik Horsman als bode ‘van de Abdijen van Rijnsburg en Leeuwenhorst in Westland en Delfland’.9Horsman was per 1 januari 1740 door de Ridderschap als bode aangesteld en werd op 25 november 1778 als kinderloze 70-jarige begraven in de Grote Kerk in Den Haag. Horsman had de taken behorende bij deze functie al vroeg overgedragen aan een plaatsvervanger, en lijkt zich vooral te hebben beziggehouden met ontginningen van duingronden en onderzoeken van waterstaatkundige aard. Vooral zijn werk uit 1773 betreffende ontginningen in de Grafellijkheidsduinen bij Den Haag kreeg bekendheid: het werd na zijn dood met instemming aangehaald door Adriaan Pieter Twent, in diens verhandeling over ontginning van de duinen op Raaphorst.10In 1800 schreef A.P. Twent over het (be)planten van duingronden in/op Raaphorst. Hij vond pas na het schrijven daarvan het stuk van Horsman, dat hij dermate goede adviezen vond bevatten, dat hij het achter zijn eigen stuk mee heeft laten drukken: ‘Concept door Hendrik Horsman, om in Graaflijkheidszeeduinen eenige bekwaame plaatsen aanteleggen tot Koornland en Houtgewas’ (p97 en verder). Aangezien de grond waarop het park van Woestduin was aangelegd – voor Ten Hove ze in erfpacht nam – ook tot de Grafellijkheidsduinen behoorde, moet de betrokkenheid van Horsman waarschijnlijk vooral in dat licht worden bezien: het temmen van de woeste duinen.

Footnotes

1 Hij erfde in 1756 de buitenplaats Rhijnauwen bij Utrecht van zijn vader, Woestduin in 1763/4 via zijn moeder en hij erfde De Nes, of Nesserak (destijds een buitenplaats op een eiland in de rivier de Vecht, ook wel Realeneiland genoemd) in 1768 uit de nalatenschap van de moeder van zijn eerste vrouw. Er zijn geen aanwijzingen dat Snoek voor Ten Hove werk op Rhijnauwen heeft verricht. Snoek werkte wel op De Nes, dat door Ten Hove werd opgeknapt ten behoeve van zijn dochter.
2 Anneke Coops, Monique Hootsmans en Jeroen Vandeursen, Leyduin, Vinkenduin, Woestduin: een visie op de toekomstige ontwikkeling van drie buitenplaatsen in Zuid-Kennemerland, Wageningen 1985.
3 Landschap Noord-Holland lijkt hun deel van Woestduin nu samengetrokken te hebben met de buurman, buitenplaats Leyduin, en het gebied als een geheel te beschouwen. Vinkenduin completeert het drietal buitenplaatsen dat nu onder de noemer Leyduin wordt gerangschikt.
4 Nationaal Archief, Inventaris van het archief van de familie Ten Hove (1589-1791), Den Haag (z.j.), p10.
5 Henk van der Eijk, ‘Het park van Woestduin, een achttiende-eeuwse creatie van Adriaan Snoek en Hendrik Horsman’, in: Cascade bulletin voor tuinhistorie 28 (2019), nummer 2, p37-55. In mijn artikel noem ik Monique Hootsmans overigens foutief Houtmans, excuses daarvoor. Ik zou graag autocorrect de schuld willen geven (en dat doe ik dan ook).
6 Volgens de conversietool van het Internationaal Instituut voor Sociale Geschiedenis (IISG) zou dat omgerekend naar 2016 ruim ƒ68,000,- zijn geweest, of € 30.980,74.
7 In 2016 zou dat omgerekend ruim ƒ78.500,- zijn geweest, of € 35.621,79.
8 Zie Coops (op.cit.), resp. een losse kaart in Deel III, Bijlage 8, Kaartbijlagen en in Deel I de Plantoelichting, waarin deze laan ‘een belangrijk onderdeel van de hoofdstruktuur’ wordt genoemd (p110).
9 Horsman was per 1 januari 1740 door de Ridderschap als bode aangesteld en werd op 25 november 1778 als kinderloze 70-jarige begraven in de Grote Kerk in Den Haag.
10 In 1800 schreef A.P. Twent over het (be)planten van duingronden in/op Raaphorst. Hij vond pas na het schrijven daarvan het stuk van Horsman, dat hij dermate goede adviezen vond bevatten, dat hij het achter zijn eigen stuk mee heeft laten drukken: ‘Concept door Hendrik Horsman, om in Graaflijkheidszeeduinen eenige bekwaame plaatsen aanteleggen tot Koornland en Houtgewas’ (p97 en verder).
Summary

Consensus has always been that a 1766 design for Woestduin by Adriaan Snoek was never realised. While that is probably true, new research into the owner’s financial records shows considerable involvement of Snoek in the layout of this park. As a surveyor, Snoek played an important role for two consecutive owners when they expanded the park to its current size. His name can also be attached to specific parts of the layout. Some of his work is still visible today, even after the creation of a racecourse (for horses) on this site in the early twentieth century.

Continue reading

Een buurman als influencer?

Terwijl ik in 2016 schreef aan mijn artikel over Adriaan Snoek op Westerhout,1Henk van der Eijk, ‘Westerhout in Haarlem – zes maanden werk voor Adriaan Snoek’, in: Arinda van der Does en Jan Holwerda (red.), Tuingeschiedenis in Nederland II: Denken en Doen in de Nederlandse tuinkunst 1500-2000 (s.l. 2016), p105-114 (Uitgeverij Tuinhistorisch Genootschap Cascade). hoorde ik al over de aanstaande publicatie van een achttiende-eeuws verslag van een reis van enkele Zeeuwse heren naar Engeland.2Ineke Storm van Leeuwen-van der Horst, Reislustige Zeeuwse regenten. De reis van Isaac en Paul Hurgronje, Paulus Ribaut en Johan Steengracht naar Londen in 1769, Hilversum 2017 (Uitgeverij Verloren). Pas onlangs kocht ik dit boek, en al vrij snel vond ik iets opvallends.

Snoek ontwierp in de herfst van 1775 een geheel nieuwe tuin voor de buitenplaats van Jan Jacob Brants, Westerhout, op de grens van Haarlem en Heemstede. Onderdeel van deze nieuwe aanleg was de uitbreiding van wat Snoek het Engels bossie noemde, in november 1775.3Van der Eijk, op.cit., p109. Uit het kasboek van Brants bleek, dat die oorspronkelijke landschappelijke aanleg ongeveer een jaar eerder moet zijn gecompleteerd: in januari 1775 werd de bekende kweker Jacobus Gans namelijk betaald voor het leveren van dive boompjes in ‘t Eng. bosje.4Van der Eijk, op.cit., p108, n16.

Westerhout en Spruytenbosch ten zuiden van de Meester Lotte Laan, ten oosten van de Wagenweg (in blauwgroen), circa 1818 (klik voor een grote versie).

De broers Isaac en Paul Hurgronje ondernamen in 1769 samen met Paulus Ribaut en Johan Steengracht een reis naar Londen en Zuid-Engeland. Zij bezochten onder meer Painshill, Hampton Court, Stowe en Wilton House. Een jaar eerder was Paul Hurgronje bij de Admiraliteit van Amsterdam benoemd tot vertegenwoordiger van de Admiraliteit van Zeeland.5Storm van Leeuwen-van der Horst, op.cit., p21. Hij verhuisde naar Amsterdam en begin 1774 trouwde hij daar met Jacoba Berewout (1737-1787).6Hun ondertrouw werd aldaar vastgelegd op 31 januari 1774. Ruim een jaar later, op 15 april 1775, kochten zij de Heemsteedse buitenplaats Spruytenbosch.7Storm van Leeuwen-van der Horst, op.cit., p24. Deze grensde aan Westerhout, de buitenplaats die Jan Jacob Brants in 1772 na het overlijden van zijn schoonvader had geërfd.8De afbeelding toont een detail van het Kadastraal minuutplan Heemstede, sectie A (genaamd Schouwbroeker), blad 01. Opmeting door landmeter F.J. Nautz, volgens het Noord-Hollands Archief in 1818. Zie over Spruytenbosch en een kaart uit 1791 waarop beide buitenplaatsen staan vermeld: Igor Wladimiroff, Hollandse Datscha’s. Hollandse en Utrechtse buitenplaatsen van Amsterdamse kooplieden op Rusland, circa 1600-1800, Heemstede 2019, p174-177 (Kantoor Verschoor).
Let wel: de voetnootnummering klopt hier niet helemaal. Zie p222, waar voetnoot 345 bij het hoofdstuk Spruytenbosch is ondergebracht, terwijl dit nummer in de tekst in het hoofdstuk Welgelegen voorkomt (p178).

Brants en zijn vrouw Anna Maria de Neufville (1742-1782) waren al direct na de overname van Westerhout begonnen met het maken van veranderingen in de aanleg. Het echtpaar is waarschijnlijk zelf op het idee gekomen om een (kleine) landschappelijke tuin aan te leggen. Voor inspiratie hoefden zij alleen maar iets naar het zuiden te reizen om de aanleg van Bosch en Hoven te bekijken, en dat was niet de enige optie in de omgeving. Maar een directe zuiderbuur die dergelijke tuinen en parken in Engeland met eigen ogen heeft gezien – is het denkbaar dat zij daarmee niet over de invulling van hun tuinaanleg hebben gesproken?

Ten tijde van de eerste aanleg van het Engels bosje waren Hurgronje en Brants nog geen buren, maar tijdens de uitbreiding ervan een jaar later wel. Heeft Hurgronje al een klein half jaar na de aankoop van Spruytenbosch aanwijzingen kunnen geven voor het ontwerp van dit deel van de tuin van Westerhout? Of eventueel later, toen het deel van Snoek’s ontwerp dat aan Spruytenbosch grensde, al in 1778/79 door Johannes Montsche werd omgevormd tot een zogenoemde Engelse Boomgaard (door diezelfde Montsche in 1781 overigens alweer aangepast)?9Henk van der Eijk, ‘Westerhout na Adriaan Snoek: Montsche en Michael’, in: Cascade bulletin voor tuinhistorie, Jaargang 2017 (26), nr. 1, p9-24, met name p11-12.

Footnotes

1 Henk van der Eijk, ‘Westerhout in Haarlem – zes maanden werk voor Adriaan Snoek’, in: Arinda van der Does en Jan Holwerda (red.), Tuingeschiedenis in Nederland II: Denken en Doen in de Nederlandse tuinkunst 1500-2000 (s.l. 2016), p105-114 (Uitgeverij Tuinhistorisch Genootschap Cascade).
2 Ineke Storm van Leeuwen-van der Horst, Reislustige Zeeuwse regenten. De reis van Isaac en Paul Hurgronje, Paulus Ribaut en Johan Steengracht naar Londen in 1769, Hilversum 2017 (Uitgeverij Verloren).
3 Van der Eijk, op.cit., p109.
4 Van der Eijk, op.cit., p108, n16.
5 Storm van Leeuwen-van der Horst, op.cit., p21.
6 Hun ondertrouw werd aldaar vastgelegd op 31 januari 1774.
7 Storm van Leeuwen-van der Horst, op.cit., p24.
8 De afbeelding toont een detail van het Kadastraal minuutplan Heemstede, sectie A (genaamd Schouwbroeker), blad 01. Opmeting door landmeter F.J. Nautz, volgens het Noord-Hollands Archief in 1818. Zie over Spruytenbosch en een kaart uit 1791 waarop beide buitenplaatsen staan vermeld: Igor Wladimiroff, Hollandse Datscha’s. Hollandse en Utrechtse buitenplaatsen van Amsterdamse kooplieden op Rusland, circa 1600-1800, Heemstede 2019, p174-177 (Kantoor Verschoor).
Let wel: de voetnootnummering klopt hier niet helemaal. Zie p222, waar voetnoot 345 bij het hoofdstuk Spruytenbosch is ondergebracht, terwijl dit nummer in de tekst in het hoofdstuk Welgelegen voorkomt (p178).
9 Henk van der Eijk, ‘Westerhout na Adriaan Snoek: Montsche en Michael’, in: Cascade bulletin voor tuinhistorie, Jaargang 2017 (26), nr. 1, p9-24, met name p11-12.

Summary

The publication of a richly illustrated travel journal, a trip through Southern England and to London undertaken by four Dutchmen in 1769, leads to new ideas about a garden in the Netherlands. Paul Hurgronje, one of the 1769 travellers, went on to buy an estate in Heemstede in 1775 (Spruytenbosch). I have written extensively about the garden layout of Westerhout, bordering to the north of Spruytenbosch, in these years. And I am now left wondering whether Hurgronje’s direct knowledge of English gardens and parks may have influenced the landscape style layout of Westerhout, his direct neighbours?

Continue reading

Voorland in de Watergraafsmeer

Afgelopen week vond de presentatie plaats van alweer het derde boek van Tuinhistorisch Genootschap Cascade. Thema van deze bundel artikelen was ‘verdwenen tuinen’. Daar zijn er nogal wat van in Nederland (en daarbuiten).

Mijn bijdrage betreft de lotgevallen van de buitenplaats Voorland in de Watergraafsmeer.1H. van der Eijk, ‘Geschetst en getekend; geëtst maar verdwenen. Voorland in de Watergraafsmeer’, in: Cascade bulletin voor tuinhistorie, Jaargang 2018 (27), nummer 2 | Jaargang 2019 (28), nummer 1, p.168-186. De bundel is in de handel : Arinda van der Does, Jan Holwerda, Korneel Ashman (red.), Tuingeschiedenis in Nederland III – Verdwenen tuinen, Stichting Tuinhistorisch Genootschap Cascade, 2019. Vanaf de aankoop in 1784 werd daar gewerkt aan de aanleg van een landschappelijke tuin, voornamelijk omringd door weilanden die eveneens in bezit waren van de eigenaren, Pieter van Winter Nsz. (1745-1807) en zijn tweede vrouw Anna Louisa van der Poorten (1752-1800).

Ontwerper van deze tuin was de van oorsprong Duitse architect Johann Georg Michael (1738-1800), die in oktober 1784 met zijn werk aan Voorland begon. De eveneens uit Duitsland afkomstige Johann David Zocher (1763-1817) werkte mee aan de aanleg, als ‘knegt’ van Michael. Hij zou niet veel later met de dochter van Michael trouwen en daarmee een belangrijke stap zetten in de opbouw van de Zocher-dynastie, in de late achttiende eeuw en gedurende een groot deel van de negentiende eeuw verantwoordelijk voor de aanleg van veel parken in Nederland.
We weten zo precies wanneer het werk begon en wie erbij betrokken was, doordat de benodigde bronnen niet alleen bewaard worden in de Collectie Six, maar vooral omdat deze sinds enige tijd in gedigitaliseerde vorm beschikbaar worden gesteld. Bij het schrijven van dit artikel in september 2018 was het aantal treffers met betrekking tot Voorland nog beperkt: 29 stuks. Inmiddels staat de teller op 63 onderdelen, en daarmee is het einde ongetwijfeld nog niet in zicht.2Voor tuinhistorici is bijvoorbeeld het gedetailleerde materiaal met betrekking tot de aanleg van Hilverbeek in 1826 en later waarschijnlijk aantrekkelijk. Hilverbeek en Voorland hadden in deze periode dezelfde eigenaren: Hendrik Six (1790-1847) en Pieter van Winter’s prettig eigenzinnige dochter, Lucretia Johanna van Winter (1785-1845).

Mijn verhaal nog eens teruglezend had ik graag wat meer tijd gehad tussen het vinden van deze bron en de toenmalige deadline. Achteraf had ik eenvoudig twee artikelen kunnen vullen met dit materiaal, en was dit stuk bij voorkeur wat minder afgeladen geweest met informatie (maar wát voor informatie!).

Ajax-stadion
Een mooie toevalligheid wil, dat het afgelopen week ook precies 85 jaar geleden was dat het Ajax-stadion in de Watergraafsmeer werd geopend. Sporthistoricus Jurryt van de Vooren schrijft over de opening van het stadion, op 9 december 1934, onder verwijzing naar divers archiefmateriaal met betrekking tot die dag, maar ook naar bouwtekeningen (die tegenwoordig in Rotterdam worden bewaard). De omvorming van boerenhoeve met rudimentaire vijver (van een buitenplaats met tuin was al sinds 1845 geen sprake meer) tot stadion vond plaats in een tijdsbestek van negen maanden. Zo snel, dat de plattegrond van Amsterdam uit 1935 alleen nog de projectie van het stadion op de resten van de voormalige buitenplaats kon tonen.

Footnotes

1 H. van der Eijk, ‘Geschetst en getekend; geëtst maar verdwenen. Voorland in de Watergraafsmeer’, in: Cascade bulletin voor tuinhistorie, Jaargang 2018 (27), nummer 2 | Jaargang 2019 (28), nummer 1, p.168-186. De bundel is in de handel : Arinda van der Does, Jan Holwerda, Korneel Ashman (red.), Tuingeschiedenis in Nederland III – Verdwenen tuinen, Stichting Tuinhistorisch Genootschap Cascade, 2019.
2 Voor tuinhistorici is bijvoorbeeld het gedetailleerde materiaal met betrekking tot de aanleg van Hilverbeek in 1826 en later waarschijnlijk aantrekkelijk. Hilverbeek en Voorland hadden in deze periode dezelfde eigenaren: Hendrik Six (1790-1847) en Pieter van Winter’s prettig eigenzinnige dochter, Lucretia Johanna van Winter (1785-1845).

Summary

Published: my latest article in the third collection of articles by Cascade, the garden history society of the Netherlands. Themed ‘lost gardens’, my piece focusses on Voorland near Amsterdam. Even before this garden disappeared under the (previous!) stadium of football club Ajax in 1934, the estate had already been dismantled and turned into a regular farm in 1845.
The increasingly digitised archives of the Six-family give a fair amount of detail about the people involved with the design and layout of this garden. They (Johann Georg Michael and his ‘help’ or ‘aide’ – future son-in-law Johann David Zocher) belong to the top of Dutch garden designers of the late 18th, early 19th century. And yes, they were both of German origin.

Continue reading

De ‘Rouina’ van Huys ten Donck revisited

Als je al wat langer stukjes schrijft, sluipt er weleens een fout, of nader te verklaren element in je werk. In dit geval moet ik een bericht van vijf en een half jaar geleden nuanceren op basis van nieuwe informatie. Mijn bericht betrof de ruïne in het park van Huys ten Donck, die volgens een rekening van de ontwerper ervan in 1777 gestuukt werd. Ik verwees naar de -voor zover ik weet- enige publiek toegankelijke foto van een glasschildering (het ding staat  er om onduidelijke redenen in spiegelbeeld). In mijn enthousiasme riep ik uit dat we van de stuclaag hadden kunnen weten, omdat de ruïne ons op die schildering al zo stond toe te stralen (of woorden van die strekking).

Op basis van die foto (hierboven een uitvergroting van het exemplaar in de beeldbank van de RCE) is de conclusie dat de gevel voorzien is van stucwerk gerechtigd. Maar de originele schildering, nog steeds aanwezig op Huys ten Donck, bewijst dat dit een foto van slechte kwaliteit is. Op het origineel is sprake van een bakstenen gevel.
Aangezien foto’s nemen in het huis niet is toegestaan, heb ik geen foto om hier te tonen. Maar misschien lukt het enkelen van u om het origineel te zien tijdens een rondleiding die bij speciale gelegenheden op Huys ten Donck worden gehouden (inclusief High Tea).

Ik vind mijn conclusie dat de gevel was gestuukt nog steeds valide. Maar dat Jonas Zeuner de ruïne met bakstenen gevel weergaf, mag in deze geschiedenis niet ontbreken. De vraag is dan ook: van wanneer dateert de schildering van Zeuner precies?1De huidige datering in tuinhistorische literatuur is circa 1781, waarschijnlijk op basis van de plattegrond van Huys ten Donck door C.W. Maan en P. Harte uit 1781, waarop de ruïne voor het eerst is afgebeeld. De ruïne dateert van 1777, maar Zeuner nam in 1778 deel aan de ledententoonstelling van de Society of Great Britain. Lidmaatschap van deze society was alleen mogelijk voor inwoners van Londen, dus hij zal de ruïne pas na zijn terugkeer hebben kunnen schilderen. We weten niet precies wanneer dat was, maar mogelijk was het stucwerk toen alweer verwijderd? En als Giudici de gevel van de ruïne niet stuukte, wat dan wél?

Footnotes

1 De huidige datering in tuinhistorische literatuur is circa 1781, waarschijnlijk op basis van de plattegrond van Huys ten Donck door C.W. Maan en P. Harte uit 1781, waarop de ruïne voor het eerst is afgebeeld. De ruïne dateert van 1777, maar Zeuner nam in 1778 deel aan de ledententoonstelling van de Society of Great Britain. Lidmaatschap van deze society was alleen mogelijk voor inwoners van Londen, dus hij zal de ruïne pas na zijn terugkeer hebben kunnen schilderen. We weten niet precies wanneer dat was, maar mogelijk was het stucwerk toen alweer verwijderd?

Summary

Over five years ago I posted a piece about the ruin in the park of Huys ten Donck, near Ridderkerk. The estate accounts mention the ruin had been stuccoed in 1777. Based on that, and on the only available photo of a contemporary painting, I concluded that the glass painting made by Zeuner shows this stuccoed front. The original, however, shows a brick wall. It appears this old photo is very bad (unfortunately I have no better photo). I still stand by my conclusion, although this new information raises several other questions.

Continue reading

Een driepuntsbrug op De Horte bij Dalfsen

Fraeylemaborg, driepuntsbrug mogelijk ontworpen door G.A. Blum

Over zogenoemde driepuntsbruggen schreef ik al eerder, met name in 2013. Ik had sindsdien al eens de suggestie gekregen van Karin Bevaart dat zij een nog niet eerder beschreven driepuntsbrug had ontdekt. Tot nu toe wist ik niet waar die brug lag, maar daar is door een artikel in het Tuinjournaal verandering in gekomen: de bewuste brug moet hebben gelegen op landgoed De Horte, in Dalfsen.1Julia Voskuil, ‘Karin Bevaart over bomen blessen, driepuntsbruggen en prehistorie’, in: Tuinjournaal (uitgave van de Nederlandse Tuinenstichting), jaargang 35, nummer 1, maart 2018, p22 en 23.

Op de kadastrale minuutplan2Landmeter S. van Lith, Kadastrale Minuutplan gemeente Dalfsen, sectie H, genaamd Emmen en Millegen, blad 01. Op de aangrenzende minuutplan van de gemeente Zwollekerspel, sectie G, blad 02, is helaas niets genoteerd of weergegeven. staat ten noorden van De Horte, halverwege tussen de buitenplaats en de Poppenlaan, te lezen: ‘De Drie bruggetjes’. Nader inzoomen op de bewuste kaart laat daar in de buurt, in een bocht van de slingerende Tochtsloot die de grens vormde tussen de gemeenten Dalfsen en Zwollekerspel, inderdaad duidelijk de weergave van een driepuntsbrug zien.

Detail van de Kadastrale Minuutplan van de Gemeente Dalfsen, sectie H, blad 01 (c1820). Rechts ligt net buiten beeld De Horte. In een bocht van de Tochtsloot is een driepuntsbrug getekend, vlak bij de tekst ‘De Drie bruggetjes’. (Het noorden is ± links.)

Ik geef haar vondst graag weer op mijn driepuntsbruggenkaart. We hadden eerder al een driepuntsbrug in deze omgeving genoteerd, namelijk op Den Alerdinck in Laag Zuthem. Opvallend is dat beide bruggen minder dan vijf kilometer van elkaar zijn aangelegd. Die nabijheid suggereert ofwel kopieergedrag van een van beide eigenaren, ofwel de betrokkenheid van dezelfde architect, voor wie driepuntsbruggen een specialiteit waren geworden.
Bevaart noemt als mogelijke ontwerper van deze brug op De Horte de architect Georg Anton Blum (1765-1827).3Voskuil, op.cit., p23. Volgens de aan mij beschikbare bronnen4Daar hoort helaas niet het boek bij van Frits David Zeiler, De Horte: een beeld van een huis (Kampen 1999). adviseerde de bijna zestigjarige Blum circa 1822 de bewoner van De Horte over de aanleg van zijn tuin rond een in 1820 nieuw gebouwd huis.5C.S. Oldenburger-Ebbers, A.M. Bakker, E. Blok, Gids voor de Nederlandse Tuin- en Landschapsarchitectuur, deel noord (Rotterdam 1995), p141. In dit licht bezien is het interessant dat op Mataram rond diezelfde tijd (1820) door de Utrechtse tuinarchitect/kweker Hendrik van Lunteren (1780-1848) een nieuwe tuinaanleg werd ontworpen (Oldenburger-Ebbers, et.al. (op.cit.), p142 en 143). Deze bewoner, Petrus Franciscus Helmich van Vilsteren, huurde De Horte van eigenaar J.M. van Rhijn, die ook het nabijgelegen Mataram in eigendom had. Van Rhijn’s band met Nederlands-Indië blijkt duidelijk uit het feit dat hij De Horte destijds Djokjakarta noemde en de buitenplaats Dieze tot Mataram omdoopte.6De Horte werd na de dood van ‘zijn [= Jo[h]annes Matthias van Rhijn] zoon’ verkocht in 1828. Ik heb sterk het vermoeden dat de zoon en latere eigenaar Johannes Wilhelmus van Rhijn heette: hij overleed als 57-jarige op 17 december 1826 in “Emmen (Dalfzen)“. Johannes Wilhelmus was ca. 1769 geboren op Java en zijn vader heette Jan Matthijs van Rhijn.
De driepuntsbrug op Den Alerdinck zou tussen 1797 en 1807 zijn ontworpen en aangelegd, ook daar wordt Blum als mogelijke ontwerper genoemd (en de onvermijdelijke Zocher).7L.H. Albers, ‘Wie was de architekt van De Alerdink bij Heino’, in Cascade bulletin voor Tuinhistorie 2 (1993), nr.2, p13-18. [pdf] Blum was mogelijk leermeester van Lucas Pieters Roodbaard (1782-1851), en heeft twee ontwerpen geleverd voor de Fraeylemaborg, waar eveneens een driepuntsbrug te vinden is. Bevaart werkt op dit moment met collega’s aan een publicatie over Blum.8Voskuil, op.cit., p23. Ik ben benieuwd wat voor nieuws er nog meer uit dat onderzoek komt, want met betrekking tot De Horte zijn nog wel wat vragen te stellen.

Klopt de huidige datering van Blum’s werk op De Horte wel?
Georg Anton Blum zou dus circa 1822 op De Horte advies hebben uitgebracht over de aanleg van de tuin.9Tussen 1812 en 1815 werkte Blum op Vilsteren, zie A.J. Gevers, ‘De tuinarchitect Blom: stukjes uit een legpuzzel’, in: Cascade bulletin voor Tuinhistorie 1 (1991), nr. 2, p3-7 [pdf]. De (familie van de) huurder van De Horte en Blum hadden derhalve een relatie die niet alleen tot De Horte beperkt bleef. De verzamelkaart van de gemeente Dalfsen is echter 1820 gedateerd, twee jaar vóór de tot nu toe bekende betrokkenheid van Blum bij de aanleg van De Horte/Djokjakarta (klik op de afbeelding voor een grotere versie). De minuutplan, waar de brug op staat weergegeven, wordt eveneens ‘ca 1820’ gedateerd, precies het jaar waarin op De Horte een nieuw huis werd gebouwd. Wat heeft landmeter S. van Lith gemeten en getekend? De oude situatie? De nieuwe, of een beetje van beiden?

De vraag is derhalve of de brug er al lag toen Blum rond 1822 aankwam. Mogelijk is Blum -of een van de andere genoemde architecten- al in een eerder stadium betrokken geweest bij vernieuwingen op De Horte. Nog geen vijf kilometer verderop werd vijftien tot vijfentwintig jaar eerder een driepuntsbrug aangelegd op Den Alerdinck. Dat is precies in de periode waarin waarin J.M. van Rhijn de buitenplaatsen De Horte en Mataram kocht (c1800). Meestal wordt een aankoop gevolgd door veranderingen aan huis en/of tuin door de nieuwe eigenaar (hij veranderde in hier ieder geval hun namen). Is het mogelijk dat de driepuntsbrug op De Horte al in of vlak na 1800 is aangelegd, vrijwel gelijktijdig met die op Den Alerdinck?
Kortom: hoe betrouwbaar zijn de bronnen die Blum specifiek rond 1822 met De Horte in verband brengen, en zijn die inmiddels achterhaald?

Footnotes

1 Julia Voskuil, ‘Karin Bevaart over bomen blessen, driepuntsbruggen en prehistorie’, in: Tuinjournaal (uitgave van de Nederlandse Tuinenstichting), jaargang 35, nummer 1, maart 2018, p22 en 23.
2 Landmeter S. van Lith, Kadastrale Minuutplan gemeente Dalfsen, sectie H, genaamd Emmen en Millegen, blad 01. Op de aangrenzende minuutplan van de gemeente Zwollekerspel, sectie G, blad 02, is helaas niets genoteerd of weergegeven.
3, 8 Voskuil, op.cit., p23.
4 Daar hoort helaas niet het boek bij van Frits David Zeiler, De Horte: een beeld van een huis (Kampen 1999).
5 C.S. Oldenburger-Ebbers, A.M. Bakker, E. Blok, Gids voor de Nederlandse Tuin- en Landschapsarchitectuur, deel noord (Rotterdam 1995), p141. In dit licht bezien is het interessant dat op Mataram rond diezelfde tijd (1820) door de Utrechtse tuinarchitect/kweker Hendrik van Lunteren (1780-1848) een nieuwe tuinaanleg werd ontworpen (Oldenburger-Ebbers, et.al. (op.cit.), p142 en 143).
6 De Horte werd na de dood van ‘zijn [= Jo[h]annes Matthias van Rhijn] zoon’ verkocht in 1828. Ik heb sterk het vermoeden dat de zoon en latere eigenaar Johannes Wilhelmus van Rhijn heette: hij overleed als 57-jarige op 17 december 1826 in “Emmen (Dalfzen)“. Johannes Wilhelmus was ca. 1769 geboren op Java en zijn vader heette Jan Matthijs van Rhijn.
7 L.H. Albers, ‘Wie was de architekt van De Alerdink bij Heino’, in Cascade bulletin voor Tuinhistorie 2 (1993), nr.2, p13-18. [pdf]
9 Tussen 1812 en 1815 werkte Blum op Vilsteren, zie A.J. Gevers, ‘De tuinarchitect Blom: stukjes uit een legpuzzel’, in: Cascade bulletin voor Tuinhistorie 1 (1991), nr. 2, p3-7 [pdf]. De (familie van de) huurder van De Horte en Blum hadden derhalve een relatie die niet alleen tot De Horte beperkt bleef.

Summary

The first addition to my ‘triple bridges’ map in almost five years is the one at De Horte, near Dalfsen. It is shown on a survey map dated c1820, but could it have been created just after 1800, around the time of the one at Den Alerdinck, not even five kilometers to the south of De Horte?

Continue reading