Voorland in de Watergraafsmeer

Published: my latest article in the third collection of articles by Cascade, the garden history society of the Netherlands. Themed ‘lost gardens’, my piece focusses on Voorland near Amsterdam. Even before this garden disappeared under the (previous!) stadium of football club Ajax in 1934, the estate had already been dismantled and turned into a regular farm in 1845.
The increasingly digitised archives of the Six-family give a fair amount of detail about the people involved with the design and layout of this garden. They (Johann Georg Michael and his ‘help’ or ‘aide’ – future son-in-law Johann David Zocher) belong to the top of Dutch garden designers of the late 18th, early 19th century. And yes, they were both of German origin.

Continue reading

Summary

Published: my latest article in the third collection of articles by Cascade, the garden history society of the Netherlands. Themed ‘lost gardens’, my piece focusses on Voorland near Amsterdam. Even before this garden disappeared under the (previous!) stadium of football club Ajax in 1934, the estate had already been dismantled and turned into a regular farm in 1845.
The increasingly digitised archives of the Six-family give a fair amount of detail about the people involved with the design and layout of this garden. They (Johann Georg Michael and his ‘help’ or ‘aide’ – future son-in-law Johann David Zocher) belong to the top of Dutch garden designers of the late 18th, early 19th century. And yes, they were both of German origin.

Continue reading

Een driepuntsbrug op De Horte bij Dalfsen

The first addition to my ‘triple bridges’ map in almost five years is the one at De Horte, near Dalfsen. It is shown on a survey map dated c1820, but could it have been created just after 1800, around the time of the one at Den Alerdinck, not even five kilometers to the south of De Horte?

Continue reading

Summary

The first addition to my ‘triple bridges’ map in almost five years is the one at De Horte, near Dalfsen. It is shown on a survey map dated c1820, but could it have been created just after 1800, around the time of the one at Den Alerdinck, not even five kilometers to the south of De Horte?

Continue reading

A triple bridge at Den Alerdinck

Den Alerdinck is the next northern example of the triple bridge. It was designed c1800, possibly by G.A. Blum(e) (1765-1827).

Continue reading

Summary

Den Alerdinck is the next northern example of the triple bridge. It was designed c1800, possibly by G.A. Blum(e) (1765-1827).

Continue reading