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Earlier I wrote some posts on 18th century mixed avenues in gardens. Ofcourse these avenues were used more often, but I found it remarkable that so much evidence could be found of avenues alternately planted with evergreens and deciduous trees.

Here’s just a quick reminder of the variety the garden designer has at his or her disposal. In an interesting -although lenghty- article in the latest issue of Garden History, Ben Lennon as an aside mentions a 19th centrury addition to the mainly 18th century garden of Tottenham Park, near Marlborough. 1)Ben Lennon, ‘Burlington, Brown and Bill: the landscaping of Tottenham park and Savernake Forest in the eighteenth century’, in: Garden History 39:1 (Summer 2011), page 26.
As a new access road to the adjoining Savernake Forest with 18th century avenues and features, an avenue of horse chestnut and common lime, planted in alternate fashion, was realised in the 19th century. Large portions of this avenue still exist. 2)The park is not open to the public, reason why images are scarce.

Maybe there are examples of this combination elsewhere?

Footnotes   [ + ]

1. Ben Lennon, ‘Burlington, Brown and Bill: the landscaping of Tottenham park and Savernake Forest in the eighteenth century’, in: Garden History 39:1 (Summer 2011), page 26.
2. The park is not open to the public, reason why images are scarce.
Summary

A 19th century mixed avenue consisting of horse chestnut and common lime. That’s all.

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