De tuinen van Bierens aan de Amstel

Filling in some blanks: the couple owning a garden I wrote about, was looking for a new gardener in 1788. For Willem Roeters, one of the candidates, information about his previous experience pointed towards two now virtually unknown gardens. The ever increasing indexes of the Amsterdam Municipal Archives helped identify one of these gardens (or rather: two adjacent ones from one owner), a garden poem and even its head gardener. But it doesn’t seem to have been a garden where Roeters could have learned the craft of modern gardening. There still is one garden left to identify, though.

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Summary

Filling in some blanks: the couple owning a garden I wrote about, was looking for a new gardener in 1788. For Willem Roeters, one of the candidates, information about his previous experience pointed towards two now virtually unknown gardens. The ever increasing indexes of the Amsterdam Municipal Archives helped identify one of these gardens (or rather: two adjacent ones from one owner), a garden poem and even its head gardener. But it doesn’t seem to have been a garden where Roeters could have learned the craft of modern gardening. There still is one garden left to identify, though.

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Voorland in de Watergraafsmeer

Published: my latest article in the third collection of articles by Cascade, the garden history society of the Netherlands. Themed ‘lost gardens’, my piece focusses on Voorland near Amsterdam. Even before this garden disappeared under the (previous!) stadium of football club Ajax in 1934, the estate had already been dismantled and turned into a regular farm in 1845.
The increasingly digitised archives of the Six-family give a fair amount of detail about the people involved with the design and layout of this garden. They (Johann Georg Michael and his ‘help’ or ‘aide’ – future son-in-law Johann David Zocher) belong to the top of Dutch garden designers of the late 18th, early 19th century. And yes, they were both of German origin.

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Summary

Published: my latest article in the third collection of articles by Cascade, the garden history society of the Netherlands. Themed ‘lost gardens’, my piece focusses on Voorland near Amsterdam. Even before this garden disappeared under the (previous!) stadium of football club Ajax in 1934, the estate had already been dismantled and turned into a regular farm in 1845.
The increasingly digitised archives of the Six-family give a fair amount of detail about the people involved with the design and layout of this garden. They (Johann Georg Michael and his ‘help’ or ‘aide’ – future son-in-law Johann David Zocher) belong to the top of Dutch garden designers of the late 18th, early 19th century. And yes, they were both of German origin.

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Mixed avenue at Elswout

Another mixed avenue planted with evergreens and deciduous trees has surfaced, now at Elswout. This is, after Beeckestijn, the second design by J.G. Michael where such an avenue an be found. Coincidence?

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Summary

Another mixed avenue planted with evergreens and deciduous trees has surfaced, now at Elswout. This is, after Beeckestijn, the second design by J.G. Michael where such an avenue an be found. Coincidence?

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Old habits never die?

The replanting of an island at Broekhuizen was done in a ridiculous manner, showing how bad execution can ruin good ideas. The good thing is that it won’t be visible anymore in a few years time.

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Summary

The replanting of an island at Broekhuizen was done in a ridiculous manner, showing how bad execution can ruin good ideas. The good thing is that it won’t be visible anymore in a few years time.

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Mixed planting in 18th century avenues

Interesting information has come to my attention in the last few months, and of course it has some bearing on the garden of Beeckestijn: avenues lined with two types of trees. On the Beeckestijn map (1772) we see such an avenue in the continuation of the central axis at the…

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Awkward new zoning plan for Beeckestijn

Things have been fairly quiet surrounding Beeckestijn the past year. To remind ourselves where things stand: last year, the decision was made to transfer the estate from the Velsen council to nature preservation society Natuurmonumenten. That could not be done directly, so Beeckestijn was transferred to a ‘middle-man’, the Dienst…

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Full moon

You may ask yourself: “What does a picture of the moon have to do with historical gardens?”. My answer: more than you presumably think (and the fact that it is a great picture is in itself reason enough to show it here). 1Source: mattie_shoes photostream on flickr For example: for…

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