On gradual loss

Yesterday I made a flash visit to the Koepel van Stoop. 1This building was built in 1840 for the Amsterdam banker J.B. Stoop, who intended to create an estate on this location. It was designed by architect J.D. Zocher jr. Problems with watermanagement on this location caused Stoop to choose an alternative location. In nearby Zeist he built Molenbosch, also a design by J.D. Zocher jr. Having been there over a year ago, I thought I’d look how the then heavily pruned trees were holding up. I say heavily pruned, but I mean prepared for removal.

[slideshow]

Photos HvdE 2010 and 2011.
Mind: this slideshow may not work well on iPad.
Fact: clicking any separate picture in the slideshow opens the original image.

I don’t know why I thought the trees were just heavily pruned, I probably did not want to think of the more rigorous option, which also resulted in cutting down a horse chestnut just north of the building. A little bit of reading could have pointed me in the right direction.
The building is in use as a studio for the artist Mijpe since 2005. Her website shows the reason for the removal of these trees: a storm in May 2009 damaged a number of beech trees near the building. To avoid damage to the cupola -which was restored in 2003- by the remainder of the trees, these have been removed from March 2010 onwards.

My only question is: is there any plan to replant the group of trees on this location? A photo in the archive of the Rijksdienst voor het Cultureel Erfgoed (RCE) shows what a background they offer, a magnificent view that is now lost. I’m guessing the trees dated back to the 1840s, and as such are part of either that design by Zocher, or of the initial plans for the establishment of an estate on this location by Stoop. Both arguments speak for a completion of the 2003 cupola restoration in its original context (i.e. cupola complete with group of trees).
Or do we accept the gradual loss of quality and context between this building and its surroundings?

Footnotes   [ + ]

1. This building was built in 1840 for the Amsterdam banker J.B. Stoop, who intended to create an estate on this location. It was designed by architect J.D. Zocher jr. Problems with watermanagement on this location caused Stoop to choose an alternative location. In nearby Zeist he built Molenbosch, also a design by J.D. Zocher jr.
Summary

The removal of trees around the Koepel van Stoop was probably a correct decision. But what about the follow-up? Is there any intention to replant the group of trees?

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