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It is not something to get all worked up about, and it is good to know that the park in question will get a boost under the guidance of Oldenburgers Historische Tuinen, but I wanted to share this with you.

The dustbin is the dark blob-on-a-stick in the center of the image and -more importantly- the center of attention as one nears the top of the elevation. No matter from which side one approaches.

A common complaint from landscape architects is that carefully orchestrated design principles of gardens and parks are often thwarted by the subsequent ill-considered placement of… let’s call it utility furniture. Today I was at Randenbroek, a historical park in Amersfoort maintained by the local council. Walking along a pleasantly winding path passing a small elevation (both created in 1814), I noticed this rather unfortunately placed dustbin (placed somewhere around 1990, I suppose). Located almost at the top of the elevation, it is upgraded from useful feature to the central focal point of this part of the park.

Bonkers! It should not be there. It is actually appalling that someone placed that dustbin exactly there. The path, the elevation, the trees, the shrubs, all that should suffice. The dustbin is a necessary feature of modern parks, no doubt about that. But nobody with any talent for aesthetics would put it where it is now.

Somewhere near the park bench would suit perfectly. Leaving aside the instances where they are responsible themselves, landscape architects often complain for a reason about stuff like this. It is after all just a matter of common sense, really.

Summary

Misplaced park furniture can ruin the total experience of a perfect design.

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